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DITCH THE CITY 
WHY WAKE UP IN THE CITY, WHEN YOU COULD WAKE UP IN
BLANDING'S BACKCOUNTRY

BEARS EARS
& VALLEY OF THE GODS


As your favorite hikes become overrun with more and more people, its time to branch out, and wander among one of the most unique landscapes in Utah. A weekend getaway in Blanding includes hiking in the vast canyons of Cedar Mesa, or one of the shorter hikes in Bears Ears National Monument, both of which, are ideal for the traveler looking to ditch the paved path and explore the trails less traveled. Some of the most monumental hikes can be found here.

For the overland travelers and campers that enjoy exploring on wheels, you have to experience the large buttes, isolated pinnacles and massive mesa walls that work together to form the Valley of the Gods. Not Familiar? Valley of the Gods is a Monument Valley-esque 17-mile loop that get you up-close and personal with various rock towers standing hundreds of feet above the ground. Blanding's backcountry is secluded and a great place to get away from civilization, be one with the landscape, and get away from crowded tourist attractions. Travelers will find that there is plenty of established backcountry where you can explore mask-free and discover our beautiful section of Utah. 

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MOKI DUGWAY & GOOSENECKS STATE PARK


Blasted into the Cedar Mesa Cliffside nearly 70 years ago, Moki Dugway is a staggering, graded dirt switchback road that consists of 3 miles of unpaved, but well-graded switchbacks. As you ascend or descend to road various viewpoints reveal sweeping views of Valley of the Gods, Goosenecks State Park, and Monument Valley.  Its truly one of the most unique locations in the world, you won't regret taking a day to explore this rural attraction. Cars and trucks alike will do just fine on this route. 

Goosenecks State Park On the edge of a deep canyon above the sinuous river meander known as a gooseneck, this small park affords impressive views of one of the most striking examples of an entrenched river meander on the North American continent. The San Juan River twists and turns through the meander, flowing a distance of over six miles while advancing one and a half miles west on its way to Lake Powell. Gaze at the results of 300 million years of geological activity, where the San Juan River winds and carves its way through the desert 1,000 feet below.

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BOOK YOUR 
TRIP TODAY!
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