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BUTLER WASH RUINS
CLIFF DWELLINGS CONSTRUCTED & OCCUPIED BY ANASAZI PEOPLE AROUND THE YEAR 1200 AD

HISTORY:
Butler Wash Ruin is a cliff dwelling that was built and occupied by the Ancestral Puebloans, sometimes known as Anasazi, in about 1200 AD. Parts of the site has been stabilized and reconstructed, but most of it remains as it was found in the 1800s. There are habitation, storage and ceremonial structures, including four kivas. This ruin is located in a side canyon of Butler Wash, on the east side of Comb Ridge.

HIKING TIPS:

Half mile trail across a mix of sand dunes and white slickrock bearing bushes, cacti and yucca, to the rim of a box canyon, opposite a 150 foot pour off. A huge sandy alcove at floor level contains no ruins; instead the structure is built in a less accessible alcove above, and seems well preserved, complete with doorways, stairs and kivas.

Round trip hiking distance is 1 mile and takes approximately a half hour. The difficulty is moderate. An interpretive sign is located at the overlook. Ample parking and a restroom is provided. There is no water at this site, and desert temperatures can be extremely hot and dry. Plan ahead and be prepared. Bring appropriate clothing and lots of water when visiting this site.

GETTING THERE FROM BLANDING:

To reach the Butler Wash Ruins trailhead, travelers will drive 3 miles south of Blanding and head west on  Highway 95. Follow Highway 95 for 10.5 miles and follow the signage to the paved pullout area. Follow this paved turnout a short distance to the trailhead where parking and pit toilets are available.